Sharing Is Caring.

Around here, the easiest way to make friends ... is to bear FOOD! Regardless of where you're from, it's the one thing that brings people together. We wanted to share a few of our favorite foods from around the world that are not only delicious, but easy to share. Now who's having a potluck?! Charcuterie, France. We love us a good charcuterie and cheese board. Unless you're vegan, you can't really go wrong with a plate of quality meats and cheeses. Charcuterie comes from the word charcutier, which means "pork butcher" in French. However, other meats may be served. The only thing that would make this even better? A glass of wine. 

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Injera, Ethiopia. Injera is the national dish of Ethiopia and Eritrea. The slightly spongy flatbread typically served with stews or veggies. When eating injera, silverware isn't necessary, because you use the bread to grab and eat the sides. Just make sure to wash your hands!

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Dim sum, China. Usually eaten around brunch time, dim sum is various types of bite-sized foods enclosed in rice flour or wheat starch wrappers. They're served in steam baskets, or on small plates and carried around in carts for you to order as you please. They're fun to order, and fun to eat!

DIMSUM28_HOB_120_cl.JPGPizza, Italy. Although pizza originated in Italy, it's become a college dorm room/Monday night football staple in the United States. It's an easy go to for people that are lazy to cook, and it still tastes good cold for breakfast the next morning.

412226Samosa, India. This Indian pastry can be fried or baked, and is usually filled with onions, peas, potatoes, lentils, and either lamb, chicken, or beef. Indian samosas however, are traditionally vegetarian. Regardless of which way you go, we think they're best served with mint sauce or chutney. Yummm.  P1020970

The Brazilian Fab Five.

As you may or may not know, Brazil is hosting this year's World Cup! As the folks here at Skout are grinding away behind our computers to give you the best product out there, we are secretly wishing we were on a Brazilian beach with a caipirinha in hand. For now, we'll be using Skout's travel feature to fly to South America. What would be first on our bucket list? THE FOOD OF COURSE! Here are five must-try dishes for anyone visiting the country! Feijoada: Feijoada is sometimes described as the national dish of Brazil. While there are different variations of it, it usually consists of beans, beef and pork. It's best prepared in a clay pot, and usually served with rice and other sides.

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Churrasco: Churrasco is a Spanish term for grilled meat. In Brazil, it's specific to barbecues. "Churrascaria's," which are restaurants that serve the grilled meat can be found outside of Latin America. Waiters carry around the meat, and slice it directly onto your plate.

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Tapioca: Brazilian tapioca is a starch extracted from the cassava plant, and can be used for an assortment of dishes both sweet or savory. A common way to prepare the tapioca is to cook it as a flatbread resembling a grainy crepe, and then adding fillings/toppings such as chocolate, condensed milk and fruits.

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Bobo de Camarao: This dish consists of shrimp in a predominately cassava and coconut milk puree. Although it can be eaten alone, it's often served with rice.

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Coxinha de Frango:  Coxinha de Frango is Portuguese for "Little chicken thigh" which is what the dish resembles. Shredded chicken, onion, tomato sauce, parsley, and scallions is wrapped in a flouer dough and fried.

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